Interactive Journal of Medical Research

A new general medical journal for the 21st century, focusing on innovation in health and medical research

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


Impact Factor 2023

i-JMR is a general medical journal with a focus on innovation in health, health care, and medicine - through new medical techniques and innovative ideas and/or research, including—but not limited to—technology, clinical informatics, sociotechnical and organizational health care innovations, or groundbreaking research.

i-JMR is indexed in PubMed and archived in PubMed Central, DOAJ, and Clarivate's Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI).

Recent Articles

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Reviews

Telemental health (delivering mental health care via video calls, telephone calls, or SMS text messages) is becoming increasingly widespread. Telemental health appears to be useful and effective in providing care to some service users in some settings, especially during an emergency restricting face-to-face contact, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. However, important limitations have been reported, and telemental health implementation risks the reinforcement of pre-existing inequalities in service provision. If it is to be widely incorporated into routine care, a clear understanding is needed of when and for whom it is an acceptable and effective approach and when face-to-face care is needed.

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With the increasing digitalization of daily life, internet-based entertainment such as gaming and streaming has advanced to one of the megatrends of the 21st century. Besides offering a multitude of controversially discussed opportunities for entertainment and social interaction, there is reasonable concern about health issues caused by the absence of physical activity among activities linked to gaming and streaming.

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Pharmacology and Pharmaceutics

Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is an anticoagulant drug that is considered a high-risk medication because an excessive dose can cause bleeding, whereas an insufficient dose can lead to a recurrent embolic event. Therapeutic response to the initiation of intravenous UFH is monitored using activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) as a measure of blood clotting time. Clinicians iteratively adjust the dose of UFH toward a target, indication-defined therapeutic aPTT range using nomograms, but this process can be imprecise and can take ≥36 hours to achieve the target range. Thus, a more efficient approach is required.

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Digital Health, Telehealth and e-Innovation in Clinical Settings

District general hospital emergency departments may refer patients to a tertiary center depending on the information available to a generalist clinician in discussion with a specialist team. If there is uncertainty, the lowest-risk strategy is often to transfer the patient. Video consultation allowing the specialist team to see and talk to the patient and local clinician while still in the emergency department could improve decision-making for patient transfer.

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Health Services Research

Academic institutions are central hubs for young adults, laden with academic and social interactions and communal living arrangements, heightening the risk of transmission of many communicable diseases, including COVID-19. Shortly after the start of the fall 2020 academic year, institutions of higher learning were identified as hot spots for rises in COVID-19 incidence among young adults.

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Cardiology

In the emergency department (ED), the result obtained using the 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the basis for diagnosing and treating patients with chest pain. It was found that performing ECG at the appropriate time could improve treatment outcomes. Hence, a wearable ECG device with a timer can ensure that the findings are continuously recorded.

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Diabetes

Incorporating physical activity into lifestyle routines is recommended for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Accelerometers offer a promising method for objectively measuring physical activity and for assessing interventions. However, the existing literature for accelerometer-measured physical activity among middle-aged and older adults with type 2 diabetes is lacking.

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Brief Reports

Virtual reality (VR), a simulated experience that can be similar to or completely different from the real world, has become increasingly useful within the psychiatric and medical fields. This VR technology has been applied in medical school trainings, exposure therapy for individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and reminiscence therapy associated with mood disorders for older adults. Perceptions of VR through the lens of the health care provider require further exploration. VR has grown in popularity; however, this modality continues to be underused in most Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals.

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Reviews

For successful aging-in-place strategy development, in-home monitoring technology is necessary as a new home modification strategy. Monitoring an older adult’s daily physical activity at home can positively impact their health and well-being by providing valuable information about functional, cognitive, and social health status. However, it is questionable how these in-home monitoring technologies have changed the traditional residential environment. A comprehensive review of existing research findings should be utilized to characterize recent relative technologies and to inform design considerations.

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Geriatrics

With the aging of the population and rising rates of chronic diseases, web-based interventions could be considered to support older adults in adopting healthy lifestyles. To date, published knowledge syntheses have focused on quantitative studies among older adults aged ≥50 years. However, those aged ≥65 years may have different needs to be met by these interventions because of the biological and physiological changes associated with aging, and qualitative studies could help advance knowledge in this field.

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Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common among people who inject drugs, yet well-described barriers mean that only a minority have accessed HCV treatment. Recent developments in HCV diagnosis and treatment facilitate innovative approaches to HCV care that improve access to, and uptake of, care by people who inject drugs.

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Articles

Recurrent angina, which is defined as a return of chest pain or chest discomfort, occurs in many patients undergoing coronary interventions.

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