Interactive Journal of Medical Research

A new general medical journal for the 21st century, focusing on innovation in health and medical research.

Editor-in-Chief:

Taiane de Azevedo Cardoso, BSc, MSc, PhD, Scientific Editor at JMIR Publications, Canada; Affiliate Senior Lecturer, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Australia


Impact Factor 2.0

Interactive Journal of Medical Research (i-JMR, ISSN: 1929-073X, Impact Factor: 2.0) is a general medical journal with a focus on innovation in health, health care, and medicine - through new medical techniques and innovative ideas and/or research, including—but not limited to—technology, clinical informatics, sociotechnical and organizational health care innovations, or groundbreaking research.

In 2023, the Interactive Journal of Medical Research received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 2.0 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023). i-JMR is indexed in PubMedPubMed Central, Sherpa/Romeo, EBSCO, DOAJ, and Clarivate's Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI).

Recent Articles

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Reviews

The advent of digital health technologies has transformed the landscape of health care, influencing the dynamics of the physician-patient relationship. Although these technologies offer potential benefits, they also introduce challenges and complexities that require ethical consideration.

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Articles

Students’ mental health crisis was recognized before the COVID-19 pandemic. Mindfulness virtual community (MVC), an 8-week web-based mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy program, has proven to be an effective web-based program to reduce symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. Predicting the success of MVC before a student enrolls in the program is essential to advise students accordingly.

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Viewpoints

The collection of sexual orientation in routine data, generated either from contacts with health services or in infrastructure data resources designed and collected for policy and research, has improved substantially in the United Kingdom in the last decade. Inclusive measures of gender and transgender status are now also beginning to be collected. This viewpoint considers current data collections, and their strengths and limitations, including accessing data, sample size, measures of sexual orientation and gender, measures of health outcomes, and longitudinal follow-up. The available data are considered within both sociopolitical and biomedical models of health for individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or of other identities including nonbinary (LGBTQ+). Although most individual data sets have some methodological limitations, when put together, there is now a real depth of routine data for LGBTQ+ health research. This paper aims to provide a framework for how these data can be used to improve health and health care outcomes. Four practical analysis approaches are introduced—descriptive epidemiology, risk prediction, intervention development, and impact evaluation—and are discussed as frameworks for translating data into research with the potential to improve health.

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Reviews

Artificial intelligence (AI) has garnered considerable attention in the context of sepsis research, particularly in personalized diagnosis and treatment. Conducting a bibliometric analysis of existing publications can offer a broad overview of the field and identify current research trends and future research directions.

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Dental Sciences

Oral health is a determinant of overall well-being and quality of life. Individual behaviors, such as oral hygiene and dietary habits, play a central role in oral health. Motivation is a crucial factor in promoting behavior change, and gamification offers a means to boost health-related knowledge and encourage positive health behaviors.

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Digital Health, Telehealth and e-Innovation in Clinical Settings

Mobile health (mHealth) technologies can be used for disease-specific self-management, and these technologies are experiencing rapid growth in the health care industry. They use mobile devices, specifically smartphone apps, to enhance and support medical and public health practices. In chronic disease management, the use of apps in the realm of mHealth holds the potential to improve health outcomes. This is also true for mHealth apps on osteoporosis, but the usage and patients’ experiences with these apps are underexplored.

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Viewpoints

Maintaining user engagement with mobile health (mHealth) apps can be a challenge. Previously, we developed a conceptual model to optimize patient engagement in mHealth apps by incorporating multiple evidence-based methods, including increasing health literacy, enhancing technical competence, and improving feelings about participation in clinical trials. This viewpoint aims to report on a series of exploratory mini-experiments demonstrating the feasibility of testing our previously published engagement conceptual model. We collected data from 6 participants using an app that showed a series of educational videos and obtained additional data via questionnaires to illustrate and pilot the approach. The videos addressed 3 elements shown to relate to engagement in health care app use: increasing health literacy, enhancing technical competence, and improving positive feelings about participation in clinical trials. We measured changes in participants’ knowledge and feelings, collected feedback on the videos and content, made revisions based on this feedback, and conducted participant reassessments. The findings support the feasibility of an iterative approach to creating and refining engagement enhancements in mHealth apps. Systematically identifying the key evidence-based elements intended to be included in an app’s design and then systematically testing the implantation of each element separately until a satisfactory level of positive impact is achieved is feasible and should be incorporated into standard app design. While mHealth apps have shown promise, participants are more likely to drop out than to be retained. This viewpoint highlights the potential for mHealth researchers to test and refine mHealth apps using approaches to better engage users.

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Public Health

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 caused the global COVID-19 pandemic. Emerging reports support lower mortality and reduced case numbers in highland areas; however, comparative studies on the cumulative impact of environmental factors and viral genetic diversity on COVID-19 infection rates have not been performed to date.

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Diabetes

Physical activity is well known to have beneficial effects on glycemic control and to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease in persons with type 2 diabetes. Yet, successful implementation of lifestyle interventions targeting physical activity in primary care has shown to be difficult. Smartphone apps may provide useful tools to support physical activity. The DiaCert app was specifically designed for integration into primary care and is an automated mobile health (mHealth) solution promoting daily walking.

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Information Quality in Digital Media

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the greatest burden of mortality worldwide, and statins are the most commonly prescribed drug in its management. A wealth of information pertaining to statins and their side effects is on the internet; however, to date, no assessment of the accuracy, credibility, and readability of this information has been undertaken.

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Psychiatry

Individuals with severe mental illness living in supported accommodation are often socially excluded. Social inclusion is an important aspect of recovery-based practice and quality of life. The Social Inclusion Questionnaire User Experience (SInQUE) is a measure of social inclusion that has been validated for use with people with mental health problems. Previous research has suggested that the SInQUE could also help support care planning focused on enabling social inclusion in routine mental health practice.

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