Interactive Journal of Medical Research

A new general medical journal for the 21st century, focusing on innovation in health and medical research

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


i-JMR is a general medical journal with a focus on innovation in health, health care, and medicine - through new medical techniques and innovative ideas and/or research, including—but not limited to—technology, clinical informatics, sociotechnical and organizational health care innovations, or groundbreaking research.

i-JMR is indexed in PubMed and archived in PubMed Central, DOAJ, and Clarivate's Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI).

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Learning and Education

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the life sciences field worldwide. Life sciences organizations (eg, pharmaceutical and med-tech companies) faced a rapidly increasing need for vital medical products, patient support, and vaccine development. Learning and development (L&D) departments play a crucial role in life sciences organizations as they apply learning initiatives to organizational strategy within a constantly evolving sector. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the work of L&D professionals in life sciences organizations changed profoundly during the abrupt shift to remote work, since learning and training normally occur in a face-to-face environment. Given the complex and dynamic situation of the pandemic, both individuals and organizations needed to learn quickly and apply what they learned to solve new, unprecedented problems. This situation presents an opportunity to study how characteristics of learning agility were evidenced by life sciences organizations and individual employees in the remote working mode.

|
Article Thumbnail
Orthopedics

Hip fracture is associated with high mortality. Identification of individual risk informs anesthetic and surgical decision-making and can reduce the risk of death. However, interpreting mathematical models and applying them in clinical practice can be difficult. There is a need to simplify risk indices for clinicians and laypeople alike.

|
Article Thumbnail
Surgery, Trauma and Surgical Sciences

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death in pediatric patients. Continued recruitment of pediatric TBI participants into a biobank amidst the COVID-19 pandemic not only necessitates adaptive changes to traditional recruitment methods but also requires an evaluation of emergency department (ED) utilization by TBI-presenting patients.

|
Article Thumbnail
ENT (Ear, Nose, Throat)

With respect to patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), posttreatment surveillance for distant disease has mostly focused on the lungs, as HNSCC distant metastasis occurs in this organ in 90% of HNSCC cases. Additionally, the incidence rate of primary tumors in the lungs is high due to the field cancerization of the entire upper aerodigestive tract.

|
Article Thumbnail
Methodological Innovations

Reducing the number of items in a questionnaire while maintaining relevant information is important as it is associated with advantages such as higher respondent engagement and reduced response error. However, in health care, after the original design, an a posteriori check of the included items in a questionnaire is often overlooked or considered to be of minor importance. When conducted, this is often based on a single selected method. We argue that before finalizing any lifestyle questionnaire, a posteriori validation should always be conducted using multiple approaches to ensure the robustness of the results.

|
Article Thumbnail
Urology

Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), ureteroscopy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy are established treatments for renal stones. Historically, SWL has been a predominant and commonly used procedure for treating upper tract renal stones smaller than 20 mm in diameter due to its noninvasive nature. However, the reported failure rate of SWL after one treatment session ranges from 30% to 89%. The failure rate can be reduced by identifying candidates likely to benefit from SWL and manage patients who are likely to fail SWL with other treatment modalities. This would enhance and optimize treatment results for SWL candidates.

|
Article Thumbnail
Viewpoints

This viewpoint summarizes the discussion that occurred during the “Translating Policy to Practice in Telehealth–Lessons from Global Implementation Experiences” panel that was held virtually at Telemedicon2020, December 18-20, 2020. This panel brought together policy and implementation experts from some countries of South Asia, Kuwait, and the European Union to share their experiences in the development and implementation of telehealth standards and of the scale up of telehealth interventions within health systems. Several common themes arose from the discussion, including the significant role of people; encouragement by respective government policymakers; addressing concerns, particularly related to privacy, confidentiality, and security; and capacity building of human resources. These are discussed in turn, along with the future directions identified by the panelists, which emphasized the need for active encouragement toward the adoption and diffusion of digital health in general and of telehealth in particular. All stakeholders, ranging from governmental policymakers to common citizens, need to come together to build trusting partnerships to realize the advantages offered by telehealth.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews

This review focused on how sexual consent ability was determined, managed, and enhanced in people with cognitive disabilities, with the aim of better understanding the recurring themes influencing the design and implementation of these approaches. If a person’s consensual ability becomes compromised, owing to either an early or late-onset cognitive disability, the formal systems involved must establish plans to balance the individual’s rights and restrictions on sexual expression. This review identified these plans, focusing on how they promoted the intimacy rights of the individual.

|
Article Thumbnail
Surgery, Trauma and Surgical Sciences

An iron infusion pathway using Ferrinject (ferric carboxymaltose) was implemented at Southend University Hospital for preoperative surgical patients with iron deficiency anemia undergoing major surgery. This was based on a treatment algorithm proposed by Munting and colleagues according to the international consensus statement on perioperative management of anemia and the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. These guidelines state that intravenous iron is indicated when oral iron is poorly tolerated or ineffective, there is insufficient time to surgery, or due to a functional iron deficiency.

|
Article Thumbnail
Health Services Research

While telemedicine has been expanding over the past decade, the COVID-19–related restrictions regarding in-person care have led to unprecedented levels of telemedicine utilization. To the authors’ knowledge, no studies to date have quantitatively analyzed both national and regional trends in telemedicine utilization during the pandemic, both of which have key implications for informing health policy.

|
Article Thumbnail
Digital Health, Telehealth and e-Innovation in Clinical Settings

There is still room for improvement in the modified LEMON (look, evaluate, Mallampati, obstruction, neck mobility) criteria for difficult airway prediction and no prediction tool for first-pass success in the emergency department (ED).

|
Article Thumbnail
Diabetes

A free clinic is a health care delivery model that provides primary care and pharmaceutical services exclusively to uninsured patients. With a multidisciplinary volunteer clinical staff, which includes physicians, social workers, dieticians, and osteopathic medical students, St. Luke’s Free Medical Clinic (SLFMC) cares for over 1700 patients annually in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

|

Preprints Open for Peer-Review

We are working in partnership with