Interactive Journal of Medical Research

A new general medical journal for the 21st century, focusing on innovation in health and medical research

Editor-in-Chief:

Taiane de Azevedo Cardoso, BSc, MSc, PhD (Acting Editor-in-Chief), Affiliate Senior Lecturer, School of Medicine, Deakin University (Australia)


Impact Factor 2.0

Interactive Journal of Medical Research (i-JMR, ISSN: 1929-073X, Impact Factor: 2.0) is a general medical journal with a focus on innovation in health, health care, and medicine - through new medical techniques and innovative ideas and/or research, including—but not limited to—technology, clinical informatics, sociotechnical and organizational health care innovations, or groundbreaking research.

In 2023, the Interactive Journal of Medical Research received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 2.0 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023). i-JMR is indexed in PubMedPubMed Central, Sherpa/Romeo, EBSCO, DOAJ, and Clarivate's Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI).

Recent Articles

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Public Health

To generate behavioral insights for the development of effective vaccination interventions, we need approaches that combine rapid and inexpensive survey data collection with instruments based on easy-to-use behavior models. This study demonstrates how an inexpensive digital survey helped identify the drivers of COVID-19 vaccination in Nigeria.

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Psychiatry

Health care workers (HCWs) in Canada have endured difficult conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many worked long hours while attending to patients in a contagious environment. This introduced an additional burden that may have contributed to worsened mental health conditions.

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Methodological Innovations

Adherence to evidence-based practice is indispensable in health care. Recently, the utility of generative artificial intelligence (AI) models in health care has been evaluated extensively. However, the lack of consensus guidelines on the design and reporting of findings of these studies poses a challenge for the interpretation and synthesis of evidence.

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Reviews

Generation Z (Gen Z) includes individuals born between 1995 and 2012. These individuals experience high rates of anxiety and depression. Most Gen Z individuals identify with being spiritual, and aspects from religion and spirituality can be integrated into mental health treatment and care as both are related to lower levels of depression. However, research on the spiritual and mental health of Gen Z is sparse. To date, there are no systematic or scoping reviews on digital methods to address the spiritual and mental health of Gen Z.

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Reviews

There is considerable evidence of the burden of care encountered by informal caregivers of persons with severe and enduring mental health conditions in low- and middle-income countries. Previous studies have highlighted the need to support these informal caregivers as key players in the care of these patients. To date, limited evidence exists on the extent and types of strategies for supporting these informal caregivers in low- and middle-income countries.

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Public Health

During the COVID-19 pandemic, a school closure policy was adopted to prevent cluster transmission in schools and subsequent household transmission. However, the effectiveness of school closure is not consistent in studies conducted in different countries.

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Reviews

Mental illness has become a prevalent issue impacting adolescents worldwide. Many barriers, including stigma and poor health literacy, prevent this population group from accessing reliable mental health care services. Synchronous text–therapy counseling is an underused therapeutic approach in combating adolescent mental illness. Phone-based text therapy is uniquely placed to offer personalized counseling to adolescents through a familiar and engaging treatment modality.

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Psychiatry

Current evidence supports physical activity (PA) as an adjunctive treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD). Few studies, however, have examined the relationship between objectively measured PA and MDD treatment outcomes using prospective data.

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Quantified Self and Wellness

Effective communication strategies are becoming increasingly important in intensive care units (ICUs) where patients at high risk are treated. Distributed leadership promotes effective communication among health care professionals (HCPs). Moreover, beyond facilitating patient care, it may improve well-being among HCPs by fostering teamwork. However, the impact of distributed leadership on the communication structure and well-being of HCPs remains unclear.

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Case Report

Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an aggressive and potentially life-threatening infection of the superficial fascia and surrounding skin, fat, fascia, muscle, and other soft tissue structures. Here, we outline the rare case of a 26-year-old man with a periorbital Streptococcus pyogenes A NF infection. Our case report underscores a unique instance of periorbital NF, distinctively presenting without any predisposing risk factors, shedding light on its presentation, treatment, and pathophysiology.

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Reviews

In the COVID-19 pandemic, a visit restriction policy for patients has been implemented in medical institutions worldwide and visits are being made using alternative communication technologies. This shift has also required the use of platforms to prevent negative consequences of these restrictions.

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Viewpoints

Loneliness affects the quality of life of people all around the world. Loneliness is also shown to be directly associated with mental health issues and is often the cause of mental health problems. It is also shown to increase the risk of heart diseases and other physical illnesses. Loneliness is studied both from the social and medical sciences perspectives. There are also interventions on the basis of health informatics, information and communication technologies (ICTs), social media, and other technological solutions. In the literature, loneliness is studied from various angles and perspectives ranging from biological to socioeconomical and through anthropological understandings of technology. From the ICT and technological sides, there are multiple reviews studying the effectiveness of intervention strategies and solutions. However, there is a lack of a comprehensive review on loneliness that engulfs the psychological, social, and technological studies of loneliness. From the perspective of loneliness informatics (ie, the application of health informatics practices and tools), it is important to understand the psychological and biological basis of loneliness. When it comes to technological interventions to fight off loneliness, the majority of interventions focus on older people. While loneliness is highest among older people, theoretical and demographical studies of loneliness give a U-shaped distribution age-wise to loneliness; that is, younger people and older people are the demographics most affected by loneliness. But the strategies and interventions designed for older people cannot be directly applied to younger people. We present the dynamics of loneliness in younger people and also provide an overview of the technological interventions for loneliness in younger people. This paper presents an approach wherein the studies carried out from the perspectives of digital health and informatics are discussed in detail. A comprehensive overview of the understanding of loneliness and the study of the overall field of tools and strategies of loneliness informatics was carried out. The need to study loneliness in younger people is addressed and particular digital solutions and interventions developed for younger people are presented. This paper can be used to overcome the challenges of technological gaps in the studies and strategies developed for loneliness. The findings of this study show that the majority of interventions and reviews are focused on older people, with ICT-based and social media–based interventions showing promise for countering the effects of loneliness. There are new technologies, such as conversational agents and robots, which are tailored to the particular needs of younger people. This literature review suggests that the digital solutions developed to overcome loneliness can benefit people, and younger people in particular, more if they are made interactive in order to retain users.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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